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Fall 2011 Vol. 11 Number 2



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FROM THE EDITORS

Bill Colglazier, Farewell and Hello

Photos by Events Digital In June E. William Colglazier retired from the Academies. Known to all as “Bill,” he served as executive officer of the National Academy of Sciences and National Research Council since 1994 and chief operating officer since 2001. His deep understanding of science and public policy as well as of people and organizations helped him make an invaluable and enduring contribution to the work and mission of the Academies.

Bill had a passionate commitment to our role as an independent and objective adviser to the federal government and to the important role science and technology can play in the life of the nation and the world. So in late July, we were delighted to learn that the Department of State had selected him to be Secretary Hillary Clinton’s new science and technology adviser. In his new position, Bill now serves as an advocate for science-based policy at the State Department and helps identify and evaluate scientific and technical issues that are likely to affect U.S. strategic and foreign policy interests. In announcing his appointment, the State Department said that Bill will “serve the U.S. national interest by promoting global scientific and technological progress as integral components of U.S. diplomacy including building partnerships with the national and international scientific communities.”

Photos by Events Digital Bill has begun his new job in Foggy Bottom, across the street from the historic National Academy of Sciences building. And he has taken on a post established as a result of a 1999 National Research Council report on the role science, technology, and health can play in our nation’s international diplomacy. So, while we will miss him here at the Academies, we can also say “Welcome back!”

(Reprinted from the July/August 2011 issue of In the Loop, the National Academies’ newsletter for staff)



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Copyright 2011 by the National Academy of Sciences